Author: Steven Savage

 

Posted on by Steven Savage

(This column is posted at www.StevenSavage.com, www.SeventhSanctum.com, and Steve’s Tumblr)

Some thoughts for all the people out there that follow me for career and creative advice . . .

Improving our skills and abilities, learning new things, is something we all develop.  Most of us do it consciously, sometimes with a great deal of planning.  It may even obsess some of us as our jobs and lives require us to learn at a rapid pace. However there’s a shadow side to what we choose to become competent in – a choice to learn something means there’s a lot else we choose not to learn at that time.

Every choice to educate ourselves means we’re spending time and resources that aren’t used learn a different subject.  Each competency is paid for in not learning something else. For all you are good at, there’s a large amount of things you don’t know and can’t do, and you chose these “incompetencies” willingly or not.

We probably don’t look at learning as “choosing an incompetency” as a form of defense because there’ so much we don’t know and it scares us.  We’re taught to think only of being good (or acceptable) at something, not bad at something.  We’re taught not to admit failure or lack of ability because we seem weak, but to ignore it or pretend we’re good at everything.

But we have to accept the truth – choosing a competency is also choosing incompetencies. If we accept the we choose our ignorance and lack of ability, we can choose wisely.  If we’ve decided we can’t truly know or learn something, then we’re prepared for that gap in our lives.

We can develop that valuable competency of knowing what we don’t know – and why we don’t know it.

We can bring an innocent attitude to learning so those that know something we do not (that we may choose not to educate ourselves on) can teach us.

We can stop worrying about not knowing.  We’re all fools at one point, so let’s be fools consciously.

Exercise: List ten things you know nothing about that affect your life.  Why didn’t you learn them? What did you learn in their place?

– Steve

Posted on by Steven Savage

(This column is posted at www.StevenSavage.com, www.SeventhSanctum.com, and Steve’s Tumblr)

I found Failbetter Games browser-based adventure game Fallen London via it’s Kickstarted sister game, Sunless Sea, a kind of nautical rogue like of comedy-horror-adventure. I quickly took to Fallen London’s playable-novel style of adventure (in fact, moreso than the brilliant but nerve-wracking Sunless Sea). As I played this game I began to wonder just why I had taken to it so much – enough to get a monthly subscription for extra elements. That’s where this essay comes in.

It’s clear this award-winning browser game has a certain something that compelled me and others. By getting my own thoughts together here I hope to make a small contribution to game analysis, as well as understand my reactions. Fallen London got me thinking about game mechanics in surprising ways, and a good analysis should help me – and others.

So let’s look at Fallen London – and what it does right. Join me, Delicious Friend.

The Basics of Fallen London

In Fallen London you’re a newcomer to the Victorian subterranean city, which was London some thirty years ago until it was stolen below ground by strange forces. Now under control of the mysterious if often friendly Masters of the Bazaar, nominally ruled by the “Traitor Empress” that made a deal with them, it’s a haunted, weird, scary, and wonderful place. Hell is nearby and has an Embassy, living objects come from distant shores of the underground “Unterzee” and previous stolen cities ruins lie around. Also, people are mailing cats.

You walk into this as a newcomer, arrested for some reason (likely just coming there), and upon escaping embark on your own destiny. Poet, spy, mercenary, investigator, and more all are available to you. As you progress you make connections, improve your character, find lodgings, unlock further secrets, and so on. Whatever you do is up to you.

All of this happens with very well-written text and story vignettes that really bring the half-horror half-comedic setting to life. Fallen London, bluntly, is probably better written than most any game and quite a few books, somewhere between Monty Python, Eldritch Horror, and Discworld.

As I analyzed it I was able to find six areas that the game did things right. These traits and mechanics, in combination, produce a marvelous experience.

Let’s take a look.

Fallen London’s Writing Writing: Expressive, Layered, Personal

It’s hard not to go on about the writing in Fallen London. Were it simply a series of novels or a comic series it’d be an epic experience on its own. The fact this writing is couched as a game makes it even more compelling as you live the writing. This excellent wordsmithing succeeds due to three factors:

Writing Comes First. It’s very clear that the writing of Fallen London is meant to be of the highest quality. The tale-telling clearly has come first over all else, bringing you into the setting, but also making the choices and usual actions of an RPG have a particular urgency and life to them. The writing is not just witty and illustrative – it makes your choices feel real, and the choices and plots are well-thought out.

Branching And Combining Stories. Various conditions unlock story options, stories have multiple resolutions with real impact, and the end of one of the tales may lead to several others. This produces clear choices that feel very real – and are often real as they will lock future choices on one hand, while opening others or at lest providing resources to open them.

Parts Of A Whole. Though there are many stories and “storylets” great care has been taken to make them part of a whole. A mysterious squid-faced man handing you a chunk of slimy amber isn’t a random event, but is due to a backstory. A marsh filled with giant mushrooms isn’t just a marsh, but the site of races as people have discovered that running across giant mushrooms is rather sporting. Everything is connected (finding these connections could occupy you quite a bit in the game).

Abstract Characters. One of the most curious elements of Fallen London is most characters are referred to by abstract names – the Wry Functionary, the Knuckle-Scarred Inspector, and so on. Instead of making them distant this abstraction makes them archetypical, giving them life, while also making the experience personal and unique. Everyone may encounter a Sardonic Music-Hall Singer, but it’s their own, personal one.

Attributes And Failure States In Fallen London: Clear, Abstract, Applicable

Representing characters with various numbers is a classic element of role-playing games. Fallen London is no different, but does it with a mix of generality, clarity, and precision.

Distinct Attributes. Characters are represented by four different Attributes – Watchful, Shadowy, Dangerous, and Persuasive. These Attributes affect a character’s chance to succeed at an appropriate task with a simple random “roll,” and a success provides colorful descriptive text as well as various rewards This simplicity makes characters and characters easy to understand – but also distinct depending on how high that Attribute is.

Attributes Associated With Settings. Various areas of the setting are associated with the activities requiring a given Attribute or Attributes. A monster-haunted area may yield mostly Dangerous tasks, while a street of crime and mysterious couriers may have mostly Shadowy activities. The limited but distinct sets of Attributes in turn allows for easy definition of various areas of the game and the stories within, as well as what one may do there.

Distinct Failure States. Each Attribute has a parallel failure state called a Menace that usually increases if one fails a more severe challenge – for instance failing a Dangerous challenge may result in an increase to Wounds. One can usually guess the probable results of a failure state from the Attribute involved and the descriptive text. The failure states also contain witty descriptions, such as one where spending time with a Vicar raises the Menace of Scandal when said Vicar turns out to be a reporter in disguise who assumes less than pure intentions. Failure is a story.

Unique Results Of Failure States. The Menaces can be treated by specific actions, such as taking Laudanum to deal with the Menace of Nightmares. In addition, if Menaces get too high then the character you play suffers specific effects, such as being imprisoned for having too much Suspicion. Addressing these challenges leads to further stories, making the tale one experiences both appropriate and unique.

Acquired Traits: Linear, Distinct, Multiple

As the character adventures, they make friends, solve cases, advance in the ranks of clubs, and so on. Representing these is done distinct from the attributes in question, often as the result of an action.

Achievements By Simple Numbers. To represent the connections people make, achievements and reputations and so on, there’s simple number scores characters acquire. These represent everything from how good a thief they are to how well-connected they may be to the police. A character may have many of these or only a few – it depends on the activities of the characters. This simple method allows for very complex character differences all with different “piles” of simple numbers.

Reputation As Number. Depending on how a character dresses, their home, and how they comport themselves, they get reputations – Bizarre, Respected, etc. that also have simple number scores, much like Attributes. The items that influence these traits, of course, often have clever and witty descriptions.

Use Of Acquired Traits. Acquired traits open up new story opportunities or may even be used like Attributes in some occasions, such as using one’s Dreaded reputation to threaten someone. Thus these acquired traits become goals, rewards, and tools while just being simple numeric stores. The drive to upgrade them also helps propel some of the game, and may inspire players to upgrade equipment and Attributes.

Progress In Fallen London: Numerical And Relevant

Progress in various ventures in Fallen London is measured by numeric scores, much like the acquired traits.

Progress Is A Number. Progress in almost anything is represented by a simple number score, often raised by challenges against Attributes or exchanging certain items. One may be “Solving a Case” and solve it when one has a score of ten. Or one may be exploring an area and solve it when one has ten points of “Exploring.” These scores are like very temporary Acquired traits, and often reset when a venture is over. These provide clear, simple measurements of progress.

Progress Influences Story. At a certain amount of “points” gained towards knowing a character or group you may unlock options such as starting a romantic relationship. Other scores may increase the challenge, such as solving a case getting harder the further one progresses, with new challenges arising. The score becomes a signal of challenges to come as well as a goal (and a player may feel their heart race as a score climbs . . .)

Negative And Conflicting Progress. These progress scores may, at times be negative or even conflict. One may be trying to outrun a rival, and as “progress” increases the rival is closer. Or one may be trying to keep one score up and another down. A few simple numbers can lead to complex stories and decisions.

Inventory; Abstracted, Related, Storied

Having a large inventory of “stuff” is a time-honored RPG tradition, and Fallen London is no different. However it uses the “adventurer inventory” to cover a wider range of ground, representing possessions far differently.

Everything As Inventory. Anything in one’s possession is portrayed in inventory, but this goes beyond guns or treasures. Possessions can also include knowledge, stories, or insights (each with its own description). One may thus have 1000 Clues or 50 different seafaring stories from their ventures – treated and inventoried no different than 70 pieces of Jade or a mysterious pistol. By treating everything as inventory the game allows a unique way to measure progress and address challenges – one may need to blackmail and enemy, and that story requires 3 Blackmail Materials (which a handy intriguer may have handy).

Inventory Presents Story Options. An item in your inventory isn’t just something to sell or “spend” for a challenge, be it pearls or an Appaling Secret. Inventory items often provide other story options when you select them, from acquiring other items to opening more stories, to helping you solve mysteries. A single kind of item might open up multiple options, giving you different ways to use them – each with their own descriptive text or substorm. One of my favorite examples is having Appalling Secrets – one option in using them is to try and “forget” a few of them with the hope of reducing Nightmares.

Inventory Converts. Another brilliant innovation in the game is that related items, from treasures to knowledge, can often be traded up in the associated “story options” mentioned. Hints become Clues, Jade can be traded for artifacts, candles traded to a church in return for mysterious salts. “Trading up” and at times “trading down” is required to unlock stories or do tasks, and figuring this out is an interesting challenge that contains its own miniature tales. One of my favorites experiences realizing that treasures I’d gathered in a seafaring venture could be swapped up to get information that in turn I could trade for a map to let me continue my adventures.

Economics: Omnipresent, Clear, Varied, Storied

As noted, some of Fallen London is about swapping various items or literal pieces of knowledge to achieve different goals. The entirety of Fallen London is actually about economics.

Progress Is Transactional. All of the well-written stories in Fallen London are essentially accessed by a transaction. This could be swapping a “move” to achieve something, or as complex as figuring out how to “grind” for information to get a legal document in order to get your hands on some important books. As these transactions are clearly stated and often work in a similar manner, the game is very easy to pick up – but the challenge is figuring how to pull off the transactions. After all you may want to save those Whispered Hints to solve a bigger mystery later, or your need to get your hands on seditious material requires you to choose between stealing from a group of Devils or getting into a fistfight with a book-carrying critic.

Tradeoffs Requiring Thought. The economics of the game also require one to consider tradeoffs. One may reduce the Menace of Nightmares with a good cup of wine, but a drunken night may raise the Menace of Scandal, which is best addressed by spending a few turns going to Church.

And So Our Analysis Of Fallen London Ends

So those are my initial thoughts on what makes Fallen London work. To sum it up I’d say it’s a writing-centric game that uses a series of simple scores and inventory systems in combination to allow for complex tales, and has simple but interesting ways to portray common game mechanics and choices. That is, of course, a simple summary.

Now as for what else we can learn, let me see where my investigations – and you reaction to this essay – take us . . .

– Steve

Posted on by Steven Savage

(This column is posted at www.StevenSavage.com, www.SeventhSanctum.com, and Steve’s Tumblr)

And Merry Post-Christmas everyone!  I hope you’re doing well.  Me, I’ve got over a week off and am enjoying it – which means plenty of time to do projects.  And by that I probably mean play videogames, but still.

So let’s catch up!

Way With Worlds Book 2 – I have finished my latest edits and am getting feedback in from pre-readers.  Very positive on this one.  Still looking to be end of March.  I will need reviewers too . . .

Way With Worlds Followup – I’ve been bouncing this idea around here and there, but there are followup minibooks to Way With Worlds.  Those are in the works.  Those probably drop in April, over time.  There’s more in my newsletters.

The Next Generator – Taking a break from Food, the next generator is a Magical Girl Team generator!  The current alpha version produces teams like “Beguiling Rose Angels,” “Rune Ladies” and “Seraphim Of Energy” which seems to be on track!

Thats about it for me – enjoying the time off and relaxing.  Of course that means writing . . .

– Steve

Posted on by Steven Savage

(This column is posted at www.StevenSavage.com, www.SeventhSanctum.com, and Steve’s Tumblr)

After plenty of interruptions, Way With Worlds Book 2 is ready for pre-readers!  So go on, get a preview, get a chance for feedback and contact me!

This one is a shift from the first book.  The first book focused on a roughly linear set of advice on worldbuilding across various subjects.  THis one is a series of collected deep dives on various issues, arranged a bit more freeform from the specific to the general.  It covers conflicts, viewpoints, worldbuilding tools, and team effort – among other diverse subjects.  It’s definitely a companion book to #1.

So give me a write, let me know if you want a PDF copy and let’s see what you think!

– Steve

Posted on by Steven Savage

And with NaNoWriMo now kicking into gear, I’ve got another sale to help out my fellow creatives!

WThe Way With Worlds 1 ebook is on sale until November 7th!  It’s a chance to get a little boost in your work and think over the world’s you’re building!

Like I said I’m not doing NaNo this year, so it’s my contribution.  Still, let’s see about next year . . .

– Steve

Posted on by Steven Savage

(This column is posted at www.StevenSavage.com, www.SeventhSanctum.com, and Steve’s Tumblr)

Yes, it’s done!  The Pizza Generator is complete and ready for your culinary randomization!

This one was another generator where I went in for really deep analysis, and I think it paid off.  Pizzas are a complex business, and I found specific “pizza patterns” that guided the generator’s design.  There were also more than I expected, which got a bit complicated.

With this I need a bit of a break from food generators.  They’re fun, but surprisingly complex, and I think because I love to cook I tend to get into them really deep.  I’m not done yet – I at least want to do a candy bar generator – but I’m gonna need a rest.

As for other generators, well I’ve got plans . . .

– Steve

Posted on by Steven Savage

I may not have time to participate in NaNoWriMo this year (I am writing, but not up for the challenge), but I figure I can make this contribution – my book “The Power Of Creative Paths” is on sale for this week!  Hope that makes everyone’s life a bit easier.

Hope it helps out.  Maybe I’ll participate next year.

To be honest, I sort of am envious people can participate.  I usually have my book plans set out months or even a year in advance so I’d have to plan that.  On top of it, NaNoWriMo seems more FUN when it’s fiction.

. . . or I could make a generator next NaNoWriMo.  Hmmmm.

– Steve

Posted on by Steven Savage

(This column is posted at www.StevenSavage.com, www.SeventhSanctum.com, and Steve’s Tumblr)

It’s there, the Pizza Generator is in Beta!

I’d say it’s mostly done – at most I need to add some new ingredients, tweak the probabilities, maybe some formatting. So let me know what you think and go forth and pizza!

Here’s some samples:

  • A pizza with Artichoke Hearts, Bannana, Romaine Lettuce, Capers, and Parsley, topped with Tandoori Sauce.
  • A pizza with Capers, Zucchini, Roasted Fennel, Shredded Carrots, Bacon, Carnitas, Tuna, Salami, and Short Rib Meat, topped with Goat Cheese.
  • A pizza with Chipotle Pepper, Pulled Pork, Sausage, Hot Dogs, and Jalapenos.
  • A pizza with Meatballs, Salami, Prosiccuto, Steak, Chicken, and Basil.
  • A pizza with Pinto Beans and Red Pepper, topped with Ricotta and Tomato Sauce.
  • A pizza with Red Pepper and topped with Cheddar.
  • A pizza with Romaine Lettuce, Almonds, and Kimchi, with White Sauce.
  • A pizza with Tuna, Carnitas, and Meatballs, topped with Goat Cheese and Fontina.
  • A pizza with Yellow Onion, White Onion, Capers, Romaine Lettuce, Pulled Pork, Buffalo Meat, Canadian Bacon, and Italian Spices.
  • A pizza with Zucchini, Sauerkraut, Black Beans, and Roasted Fennel, topped with Havarti.
  • A pizza with Bean Sprouts, Jalapenos, Tomatoes, Red Onion, Roasted Fennel, Hot Dogs, Clams, and Herbs De Province.
  • A pizza with Buffalo Meat, Pepperoni, Tuna, Meatballs, and Parsley, topped with Mascarpone.
  • A pizza with Carnitas.
  • A pizza with Jalapenos, Bannana, Garbanzo Beans, Bacon, Chicken, Prosiccuto, Egg, and Cilantro.
  • A pizza with Olives, Shredded Carrots, Butternut Squash, Chipotle Pepper, Roasted Fennel, Jalapenos, and Bannana Peppers.
  • A pizza with Pickled Ginger, Yellow Onion, Black Olives, Red Pepper, Burdok Root, and Basil, topped with Paneer Sauce.
  • A pizza with Pine Nuts, Pickled Garlic, Red Onion, Pulled Pork, Linguica, Buffalo Meat, and Tuna, topped with Goat Cheese.
  • A pizza with Pinto Beans and Pineapple, topped with Fontina and Tandoori Sauce.
  • A pizza with Salami, topped with Goat Cheese, Cream Cheese, and Mustard.
  • A pizza with Steak, Butter Chicken, Canadian Bacon, and Ham, topped with Parmesian and Barbeque Sauce.

– Steve

Posted on by Steven Savage

(This column is posted at www.StevenSavage.com, www.SeventhSanctum.com, and Steve’s Tumblr)

The pizza generator is very close to done.  I’ve got to expand the formulas for meat/veggie combos and maybe tweak the probabilities, then it’s good to go!  Check these out!

  • A pizza with Apple, Pinto Beans, Zucchini, Pineapple, Natto, Garlic, and Roasted Fennel, topped with Fontina and Bulgogi Sauce.
  • A pizza with Apple, White Onion, Salami, Short Rib Meat, Hot Dogs, and Bacon.
  • A pizza with Artichoke Hearts, Broccoli, Cilantro, and Parsley, topped with Gouda and Pesto Sauce.
  • A pizza with Artichoke Hearts, Mushrooms, Burdok Root, White Onion, Fennel, and Roasted Fennel, topped with Tomato Sauce.
  • A pizza with Cauliflower, Jalapenos, and Herbs De Province.
  • A pizza with Green Pepper, Cauliflower, Banana, Egg, Prosiccuto, Pulled Pork, Tuna, and Butter Chicken.
  • A pizza with Ground Beef, Egg, Ham, and Banana Peppers, topped with Parmesian.
  • A pizza with Pickled Ginger, Yellow Onion, Cashews, and Parsley.
  • A pizza with Red Onion, Scallions, Zucchini, Pickled Ginger, Argula, and Red Chillies.
  • A pizza with Romaine Lettuce, Kimchi, Red Pepper, Fennel, and Garlic.
  • A pizza with Argula, Eggplant, Yellow Onion, Cashews, Roasted Fennel, and Cilantro, topped with Swiss Cheese and Tandoori Sauce.
  • A pizza with Canadian Bacon, Linguica, Prosiccuto, and Bannana Peppers.
  • A pizza with Carmelized Onions, Black Olives, Sauerkraut, Chipotle Pepper, and Herbs De Province, topped with Barbeque Sauce.
  • A pizza with Clams, Pulled Pork, Salami, Herbs De Province, and Red Chillies.
  • A pizza with Jalapenos, Burdok Root, Pickles, Potatoes, and Green Pepper, topped with Colby and Fontina.
  • A pizza with Kidney Beans, Pine Nuts, Pinto Beans, Butter Chicken, Hot Dogs, and Tuna.
  • A pizza with Mushrooms and Bacon.
  • A pizza with Roasted Fennel, Bell Pepper, Olives, Black Beans, and Basil, topped with Colby.
  • A pizza with Salami, Tuna, Garlic, and Italian Spices, topped with Cheese Sauce.
  • A pizza with Zucchini, Caramelized Onions, Shredded Carrots, Pickled Jalapenos, Mango, and Cilantro, topped with Ricotta and Cheddar.

The updated version has options for any, meats only, veggies only, and of course mixes.  It’s led to some insane stuff – but also some delicious ideas.

– Steve

Posted on by Steven Savage

(This column is posted at www.StevenSavage.com, www.SeventhSanctum.com, and Steve’s Tumblr)

So I’m back to work on the pizza generator, using all that data I collected before things got nutty.  This one is coming along well, but the data structures are surprisingly complex, so it’s going to take a week or two more to finish depending on my schedule.  However the results . . . well they speak for themselves!

  • A pizza with broccoli, black olives, zucchini, mango, pickled ginger, egg, clams, bacon, and linguica.
  • A pizza with butter chicken, linguica, salami, and ground beef, topped with fontina.
  • A pizza with chicken, bacon, and roasted fennel, topped with paneer.
  • A pizza with garbanzo beans, red pepper, kimchi, pickled garlic, apple, and egg.
  • A pizza with ground beef and jalapenos, topped with asiago and havarti.
  • A pizza with ham and butter chicken, topped with paneer.
  • A pizza with hot dogs and cilantro.
  • A pizza with mango, roasted fennel, canadian bacon, prosiccuto, ham, linguica, and pepperoni.
  • A pizza with pickled ginger, kimchi, shrimp, pulled pork, butter chicken, and steak.
  • A pizza with roasted fennel, steak, clams, bacon, sausage, and hot dogs.
  • A pizza with salami, butter chicken, meatballs, tuna, and short rib meat, topped with mozzarella and brown sauce.
  • A pizza with salami, egg, pepperoni, and shrimp.
  • A pizza with short rib meat, garlic, and parsley.
  • A pizza with spinach, shredded carrots, apple, pickled ginger, and argula.
  • A pizza with yellow onion, argula, canadian bacon, clams, tuna, and sausage.

It’s a bit meat-centric right now (results in the end will split between vegetarian and meat results), but looking good and properly crazy-yet-possible.

So strap on, your culinary dreams will continue!

After this I may take a break from food generators – they’re surprisingly challenging.  But I still want to do more, just maybe not one after another.

– Steve

...
Seventh Sanctum™, the page of random generators.

...  ...  ... ...

...
 
Seventh Sanctum(tm) and its contents are copyright (c) 2013 by Steven Savage except where otherwise noted. No infringement or claim on any copyrighted material is intended. Code provided in these pages is free for all to use as long as the author and this website are credited. No guarantees whatsoever are made regarding these generators or their contents.

&nbps;

Seventh Sanctum Logo by Megami Studios