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Posted on by Steven Savage

(This column is posted at www.StevenSavage.com, www.SeventhSanctum.com, and Steve’s Tumblr)

The pizza generator is very close to done.  I’ve got to expand the formulas for meat/veggie combos and maybe tweak the probabilities, then it’s good to go!  Check these out!

  • A pizza with Apple, Pinto Beans, Zucchini, Pineapple, Natto, Garlic, and Roasted Fennel, topped with Fontina and Bulgogi Sauce.
  • A pizza with Apple, White Onion, Salami, Short Rib Meat, Hot Dogs, and Bacon.
  • A pizza with Artichoke Hearts, Broccoli, Cilantro, and Parsley, topped with Gouda and Pesto Sauce.
  • A pizza with Artichoke Hearts, Mushrooms, Burdok Root, White Onion, Fennel, and Roasted Fennel, topped with Tomato Sauce.
  • A pizza with Cauliflower, Jalapenos, and Herbs De Province.
  • A pizza with Green Pepper, Cauliflower, Banana, Egg, Prosiccuto, Pulled Pork, Tuna, and Butter Chicken.
  • A pizza with Ground Beef, Egg, Ham, and Banana Peppers, topped with Parmesian.
  • A pizza with Pickled Ginger, Yellow Onion, Cashews, and Parsley.
  • A pizza with Red Onion, Scallions, Zucchini, Pickled Ginger, Argula, and Red Chillies.
  • A pizza with Romaine Lettuce, Kimchi, Red Pepper, Fennel, and Garlic.
  • A pizza with Argula, Eggplant, Yellow Onion, Cashews, Roasted Fennel, and Cilantro, topped with Swiss Cheese and Tandoori Sauce.
  • A pizza with Canadian Bacon, Linguica, Prosiccuto, and Bannana Peppers.
  • A pizza with Carmelized Onions, Black Olives, Sauerkraut, Chipotle Pepper, and Herbs De Province, topped with Barbeque Sauce.
  • A pizza with Clams, Pulled Pork, Salami, Herbs De Province, and Red Chillies.
  • A pizza with Jalapenos, Burdok Root, Pickles, Potatoes, and Green Pepper, topped with Colby and Fontina.
  • A pizza with Kidney Beans, Pine Nuts, Pinto Beans, Butter Chicken, Hot Dogs, and Tuna.
  • A pizza with Mushrooms and Bacon.
  • A pizza with Roasted Fennel, Bell Pepper, Olives, Black Beans, and Basil, topped with Colby.
  • A pizza with Salami, Tuna, Garlic, and Italian Spices, topped with Cheese Sauce.
  • A pizza with Zucchini, Caramelized Onions, Shredded Carrots, Pickled Jalapenos, Mango, and Cilantro, topped with Ricotta and Cheddar.

The updated version has options for any, meats only, veggies only, and of course mixes.  It’s led to some insane stuff – but also some delicious ideas.

– Steve

Posted on by Scott Delahunt

In the tabletop role-playing game industry, Dungeons & Dragons is the 800 pound gorilla, the game that the general population knows by name.  The game has had a cinematic adaptation that didn’t work as either a movie or an adaptation.  However, the movie wasn’t the first adaptation of the game.  In 1985, an animated series based on the game began airing on CBS.  The series would last two seasons, with animation by Toei.

The 80s were an odd time for the game.  Dungeons & Dragons had managed to break away from specialty game stores to appear in toy stores and book shops.  At the same time, parent groups appeared to counter the game’s popularity, accusing the game and its publisher, TSR, of being satanic.  One group, Bothered About Dungeons & Dragons headed by Patricia Pulling, managed to make some headway with law enforcement despite dubious research and math and even appeared on 60 Minutes in 1985.  The D&D cartoon thus had some extra restrictions on it beyond the usual Saturday morning ones.

The opening credits of the cartoon told how the characters got involved.  A ride at an amusement park deposits a group of friends into a fantasy world, where they’re immediately set upon by two villains, Venger and Tiamat.  However, with the intervention of Dungeon Master, the group gains magic items that helps them escape.  Each of the main characters represented a different character class.  Hank became a Ranger, receiving a magical bow.  Sheila, with her cloak of invisibility, became a Thief.  Presto received a magic hat to become a Magic-User, the term used for wizards in Advanced Dungeons & Dragons‘ first edition.  With the Unearthed Arcana also being released in 1985, character classes from that supplement were also used.  Sheila’s younger brother Bobby became a Barbarian with a magic club.  Diana received a magical staff, letting her become a Thief-Acrobat.  And, finally, Eric became a Cavalier upon receiving a magic shield.  After arriving in the world, Bobby befriended a young unicorn colt, Uni.  Making a noticeable absence is the Cleric, but given the Satanic Panic around the game, leaving the class out meant feidling fewer calls from angry special interest groups.

Over the course of the series, the group of young intrepid adventurers sought to find a way back to their home.  Dungeon Master would appear to provide guidance in the form of riddles, leading the adventurers into situations where they would use their abilities to help others in need.  Meanwhile, Venger would appear to try to get the group’s magic items or Tiamat, former Babylonian goddess turned five-headed ruler of the evil dragons, would appear to menace.  Dungeon Master was well-meaning but capricious, dangling hope in front of the adventurers, much like some actual DMs.  Each of the main characters showed elements of their representative classes, from Sheila’s sneaking to Presto’s magic, though not exactly to the rules.  Eric, on the other hand, didn’t show the Cavalier’s valour, though that was a decision made thanks to executive meddling.  The rule at the time was to have teamwork, and anyone who went against the group was thought to be in the wrong.  Eric was designated the one to be in the wrong, even if his idea, typically running away, was a viable choice.

The mechanics of AD&D were hidden, meant to be more the physics of the fantasy world than anything else.  Monsters that did appear did come from the game.  No one rolled a die to determine hit or miss, but such a scene would break immersion.  Instead, the setting came from the rules, though not specifically Greyhawk, Gary Gygax’s home campaign.  The adventures were aimed at a younger audience, the extreme low end of the “For ages 12 and up” range.  However, some of the episodes wouldn’t be odd to have as an evening’s play session, even with D&D‘s fifth edition.  Having Dungeon Master be a character in the series was an odd choice, but the role worked and showed potential players how to be a DM and still allow the players to have fun while working through a challenge.

The D&D cartoon was an odd duck in a decade that was defined by odd ducks.  Few popular media ever faced a strong challenge by special interest groups as /D&D/ did, and, yet, the game remained popular.  The cartoon followed in the game’s footsteps, creating its own niche and presenting a setting usable with the game without getting too bogged down in details.

Posted on by Steven Savage

(This column is posted at www.StevenSavage.com, www.SeventhSanctum.com, and Steve’s Tumblr)

So I’m back to work on the pizza generator, using all that data I collected before things got nutty.  This one is coming along well, but the data structures are surprisingly complex, so it’s going to take a week or two more to finish depending on my schedule.  However the results . . . well they speak for themselves!

  • A pizza with broccoli, black olives, zucchini, mango, pickled ginger, egg, clams, bacon, and linguica.
  • A pizza with butter chicken, linguica, salami, and ground beef, topped with fontina.
  • A pizza with chicken, bacon, and roasted fennel, topped with paneer.
  • A pizza with garbanzo beans, red pepper, kimchi, pickled garlic, apple, and egg.
  • A pizza with ground beef and jalapenos, topped with asiago and havarti.
  • A pizza with ham and butter chicken, topped with paneer.
  • A pizza with hot dogs and cilantro.
  • A pizza with mango, roasted fennel, canadian bacon, prosiccuto, ham, linguica, and pepperoni.
  • A pizza with pickled ginger, kimchi, shrimp, pulled pork, butter chicken, and steak.
  • A pizza with roasted fennel, steak, clams, bacon, sausage, and hot dogs.
  • A pizza with salami, butter chicken, meatballs, tuna, and short rib meat, topped with mozzarella and brown sauce.
  • A pizza with salami, egg, pepperoni, and shrimp.
  • A pizza with short rib meat, garlic, and parsley.
  • A pizza with spinach, shredded carrots, apple, pickled ginger, and argula.
  • A pizza with yellow onion, argula, canadian bacon, clams, tuna, and sausage.

It’s a bit meat-centric right now (results in the end will split between vegetarian and meat results), but looking good and properly crazy-yet-possible.

So strap on, your culinary dreams will continue!

After this I may take a break from food generators – they’re surprisingly challenging.  But I still want to do more, just maybe not one after another.

– Steve

Posted on by Scott Delahunt

ABC announced that it is working on a sequel to the 80s detective series, Magnum, P.I., with John Rogers and Eva Longoria as the showrunners.  Longoria’s studio, UnbeliEVAble Entertainment, has access to Universal TV’s catalog.  The new Magnum will focus on the detective’s daughter, Lily.

The original Magnum starred Tom Selleck in the title role and ran eight seasons.  Set in Hawaii, Magnum ran a detective agency while working as security for the unseen Robin Masters.  Magnum had access to some of Masters’ possessions, including a Ferrari, but only under the watchful eye of Higgins, played by Jonathan Hillerman.  Helping Magnum were his friends, bar owner Rick, played by Larry Manetti, and helicopter pilot TC, played by Roger E. Mosley; all three had served together during the Vietnam War.  While the series had a light touch throughout its run, it did delve into the effect the war had on Magnum and his friends, and would go dark when needed.  Later in the series, Rick’s gangster friend Icepick, played by Elisha Cooke, joined the cast.

The new Magnum, is a sequel, as mentioned.  John Rogers has said that Tom Selleck is too iconic as Magnum to replace.  A sequel leaves Selleck as the original Magnum and leave room for him to make guest appearances.  The new Magnum, Lily, did appear in the original series, including the series finale.  The character isn’t coming out of nowhere.  The new Magnum isn’t just a gender-flipped version; she is part of the continuity.

The difficulty the Magnum sequel will have is getting the tone right out of the gate.  It has to match the tone of the original series, not just season by season but also overall.  The original Magnum‘s tone evolved as the series progressed over its eight seasons, starting light but getting deeper into Magnum’s history and relationships as the show aired.  However, expectations of the new series may require mix the feel of both early and later seasons.  It’ll be tough.

What the new Magnum has going for it is show runner John Rogers.  Rogers has experience in television with series that can run the gamut between light and dark with the same season and even the same episode.  His series Leverage, which can be described as a heist movie in under an hour, has fully-fleshed characters who have camaraderie that isn’t forced.  Indeed, the characters don’t always get along, despite being on a team.  Rogers has a good grasp on inter-character dynamics, something that the original Magnum also demonstrated.

With adaptations reaching saturation levels, getting buy-in from the audience will be critical for the new Magnun, P.I., but the sequel has several advantages that should help it keep people watching past the first episode.  It’ll be a balancing act until the show finds its own way, but it should succeed.

Posted on by Steven Savage

Well it’s not generator related, but it is creativity related, and ties into Scott’s considerable work – my first pop-culture book, co-authored with my good friend Bonnie, is out!

It’s called Her Eternal Moonlight, and is a look at female Sailor Moon fandom in North America.  It was pretty interesting to study this; interviewing people, finding common patterns, then communicating it as a book.  It definitely gave me a lot of insights.

It’s also getting reviews here and there, and we’re also discussing it on podcasts:

Now with that done, maybe it’s time to get to some generators and creative writing – but there is going to be another study coming up starting next year . . .

– Steve

Posted on by Scott Delahunt

Movies aren’t the only medium that adapts.  Television will adapt, remake, and reboot, too, to varying degrees of success.  Genres abound on TV, from soap operas – daytime and nighttime – to police procedurals, from sitcoms to action-adventure, adding to the feeling of familiarity.  The nature of television has changed over the past few decades.  Where once viewers had a choice of three or four stations, there are several hundred options, with channels for every niche.  This change means that programming for the lowest common denominator means that’s the only denomination that is watching.  Still, with the sheer amount of competition for eyes, not helped by the infinite channels available on the Internet, studios and networks are looking for anything that will let them sell ad time.  Remakes of memorable shows is one way to get viewers, at least for the first episode.

This season, the 2016-2017 season, is seeing a number of adaptions, including at least two shows based on movies – Rush Hour and Lethal Weapon.  Also premiering is a remake of the Richard Dean Anderson series, MacGuyver.  The original series ran for seven seasons, featuring Anderson as the title character, capable of creating solutions out of anything on hand, to the point where creative solutions are known as MacGuyvering.  Anderson’s MacGuyver prefered the more peaceful solution over easy violence.  MacGuyver used guns a total of two times over the seven season run; once was a rifle set to shoot into the ground, with each bounce due to recoil resulting in another trigger pull, and once to use a heavy revolver as a wrench.

Mac worked for the Phoenix Foundation, run by Pete Thornton, played by Dana Elcar.  Pete was nominally Mac’s boss, but the relationship was more friendship than anything else.  Mac’s pilot friend Jack Dalton, played by Bruce McGill, wasn’t part of the Foundation, but appeared often.  Jack was more likely to get Mac involved in existing trouble, often triggering Mac’s acrophobia.  Other recurring characters include budding actress Penny Parker, played by Teri Hatcher, and Mac’s nemesis Murdoc, played by Michael Des Barres.  A typical epsiode of MacGuyver dropped Mac into a situation, usually an investigation, with several opportunities to jury-rig a solution with whatever is on hand.  The show was light entertainment, with the added draw of viewers trying to figure out what Mac would do with the materials on hand, with Anderson narrating the action.  In the first season, the pre-credits teaser, called the opening gambit, was often written by Dalek creator Terry Nation.

The new MacGuyver debuted September 23 and is a remake of the original instead of a continuation.  However, Lee David Zlotoff, creator of the original MacGuyver, is on board as an executive producer, with Henry Winkler returning as another.  The new Mac, played by Lucas Till, still works for Thornton, Patricia Thornton, played by Sandrine Holt.  The pilot begins with Thornton as the head of the Department of External Services, one of the myriad intelligence agencies in the US.  Mac is part of a team with Jack Dalton, now played by George Eads, and Nikki Carpenter, played by Tracy Spiridakos.  Over the course of the episode, Nikki is replaced by the new character, hacker Riley Davis, played by Tristin Mays, and the DXS becomes the Phoenix Foundation.

With just one episode, it’s too soon to do a proper analysis of the series.  It takes time for a show to find its legs as actors figure out their roles.  However, first impressions do happen.  Casting is tough; Richard Dean Anderson’s Mac is iconic; Lucas Till has big shoes to fill.  Helping, though, is that he can pass as a young MacGuyver, even taking into account the difference in hairstyles between 1985 and 2016.  The new Mac still prefers a peaceful solution, eschewing guns, and still creates jury-rigged solutions on the fly.  With the advances in electronics and computers over the past thirty years, there are new ways to MacGuyver a solution to a tough problem.  The big change is in the approach.  Mac now has a team instead of working solo, and Jack is now part of that team.  Jack is also is the heavy on the team, as likely to pull out a gun and shoot as the opposition is, in contrast to Mac.  Patricia Thornton is less buddy-buddy with Mac than Pete Thornton was but is still sympathetic.

The new MacGuyver still needs a few episodes to get comfortable in its own skin.  There is a lot of baggage from the original that just can’t be hidden, such as Mac’s first name.  Once a secret kept until near the end of the series, the name is known well enough by the potential audience that keeping it hidden would just be awkward.  However, the show has potential once it settles in.  Lucas Till isn’t Richard Dean Anderson, nor should he try to be him.  The new Mac needs to be his own person, informed by the original but not a carbon copy, especially given the thirty year difference between the two series.  The pilot of the new MacGuyver did feel like a first season episode of the original, and has potential.  The new show needs to balance the legacy of the original while still being its own series.

Posted on by Scott Delahunt

Over the weekend of September 9-11, I was at Can-ConSF, a literary science-fiction and fantasy convention in Ottawa, Ontario.  The con is small but brings both readers and writers together to discuss various topics.  One of the panels was called “Adapting Literary Works to Television and Movies”, so, naturally, I had to go.

There were five panelists, representing different views of being adapted.  Tanya Huff, one of the author guests of honour, had her Blood books* adapted as a TV series that can still appear on Canadian cable stations thanks to Canadian content requirements.  Ian Rogers is a horror writer who has had stories optioned by Roy Lee, but nothing is going to pilot yet.  Jay Odjick is the creator of Kagagi the Raven, a comic that he adapted as a cartoon that airs on APTNSam Morgan is a literary agent with the JABberwocky Literary Agency, and provided the insider view.  Moderating was Violette Malan, a fantasy novelist.

While there are some writers who either don’t want their works adapted or have had bad experiences and won’t go down that path again, for most, getting optioned is like winning the lottery, except the lottery has better odds.  The money from being optioned isn’t that much, but if the adaptation is picked up, it can be comfortable.  Tanya was able to pay off her mortgage thanks to Blood Ties going to air and still sees royalties coming in from the series.**  But, while the money from adaptations may not be much, there is a boost in sales of the original work that comes immediately afterwards.  Tanya saw a thirty percent increase in the sales of her Blood books right after the first episode aired.  This boost, though, doesn’t necessarily carry over with comics.  Jay didn’t see an increase and believes that movies may be too different from the comic to entice new readers.

Writers have little control over how a work gets adapted.  Some writers may have more leverage; JK Rowling, thanks to the success of Harry Potter, managed to ensure that the movies remained as faithful as possible, but most writers don’t have that luxury.  Stephen King treats adaptations of his works as entities separate from the originals.  Changes will be made and the writer is low on the totem pole when it comes to decision making.  The best thing to do in that case is to treat the adaptation like a grandchild; don’t complain about how they’re raised or you won’t see another grandchild ever.  Tanya treats adaptations as fanfic that she’s getting paid for.  She even wrote an episode of Blood Ties, so she wrote fanfic of her own work.***

Kagagi the Raven is a little different.  Jay tried shopping the adaptation around, looking for someone to pick it up.  He and his partner wound up producing the series themselves.  As a result, he had more initial control once APTN licensed the series from him.  However, APTN doesn’t pay for the show until it’s done.  Jay had to find a distributor to sell the show internationally.  As a result, Jay is now beholden to network distributors and advertisers.  However, Jay now has a producer credit and can now make pitches far more easily than when he was shopping Kagagi.

Each of the panelists had works optioned in different ways.  Jay, as mentioned above, became a producer to turn his comic into a cartoon.  With Tanya’s Blood Ties, the series had been optioned since the third book, with Kaleidoscope being the studio to take the adaptation to pilot and then to series.  Kaleidoscope had read the books and loved them but, being Canadian, couldn’t pay as well as an American studio.  To make up for that, they let Tanya be involved with the show.  With Ian, Roy Lee, who had adapted a number of Japanese horror movies including The Ring, had one of Ian’s stories recommended to him.  Lee contacted Ian out of the blue to option the story, and took a number of other ones that were related.  Ian now has credit as a consulting producer even though the series hasn’t gone to pilot.  Sam, the literary agent, often gets called to find out if the rights to a book are available.  With True Blood, Alan Ball had bought the book prior to a dentist appointment, then read it afterwards while recovering, and the rest is history.  Sam also mentioned that production companies have people, book-to-film agents whose job it is to find works that could be adapted.

The big takeaway, at least from the writer’s view, is to know when to take credit.  If the movie or series is a hit, take the credit as the creator.  If the movie or series is a flop, blame Hollywood.  “Eh, you know how it is in Hollywood.”  This goes back to treating an adaptation as a grandchild; changes will be made.  Knowing that changes happen and accepting that it’s beyond a writer’s control means sleeping easier, especially with option and royalty money coming in.

* Not to be confused with the Books of Blood by Clive Barker.
** Tanya recently received a $600 cheque thanks to Blood Ties being in the top ten shows in Pakistan.
*** Tanya also reports that most final drafts of scripts keep no more than five lines from the first.  Her episode of Blood Ties managed to keep in six thanks to some actor improvisation that matched her early draft.

Posted on by Steven Savage

(This column is posted at www.StevenSavage.com, www.SeventhSanctum.com, and Steve’s Tumblr)

I’m actually getting back to these!  Awesome!

Work should be a bit calmer now.  We had some changes in organization and process that look to be more efficient and effective, and it’s already paying dividends in just a week.  So let’s hope you see more writing out of me (though my goal is to be writing anyway).

So from here . . .

Next Way With Worlds Book

Way With Worlds Book 2 is still being edited, and I sink my teeth into it next month.  It’s definitely not going to be out until February, but I can’t see it being any later than March.

The “followup” works on Way With Worlds are underway.  As usually, not spilling much here (but you can find out a bit more in my newsletter if you’re really curious).  More and more I’m thinking it may be worth releasing early, but I don’t want to stress myself.  At this rate, I’d like to actually get people’s opinions – release it early or after Book 2?

I will say after all this I may take a break from writing on Worldbuilding.  Think I’ll have said my peace for awhile.

Random Creativity Book

So now that I’m pretty sure I’ll be writing on randomization and creativity, I’ve got to figure out just how to do it.  I probably won’t start brainstorming it for at least another month, to be honest.  What I want to do is distill all my wisdom from Seventh Sanctum into book form (hopefully, one book).  The hardest part is figuring out where to start and then how to put it in some organized form.

The second part?  A title.

Seventh Sanctum

Trying to find time to bang out the Pizza Generator as the data is all ready, so I can do something else.  I think having it hanging over my head kind of killed the fun and I need to move to another generator.  That happens.  Maybe I’ll revisit it another time.

But we must have random pizza, because who doesn’t want kimchi and bacon pizza with havarti?  Wait, that sounds good . . .


I’ve got a full slate coming up – be sure to check my speaking page!

Con-Volution is my next convention, and I’ll be speaking on worldbuilding and monsters on Friday!  Go, attend!

That’s it for me – what about you?

– Steve

Posted on by Scott Delahunt

The original Star Trek recently celebrated its 50th anniversary of the air date of its first episode, “The Man Trap”.  Since then, the series has had a number of adaptations, including feature films, continuation TV series, games, comics, books, and even a cartoon.  However, when the last first-run episode, “Turnabout Intruder” aired, fans had to resign themselves to watching the series in syndication, despite the efforts put into letter writing campaigns.

The dearth of new Star Trek episodes came to an end in 1973, when Gene Roddenberry worked with Filmation to create an animated series.  Now known as Star Trek: The Animated Series, to distinguish it from other Trek entries, the cartoon brought back the crew of the USS Enterprise for two more seasons, this time on Saturday mornings.  Filmation is best known for series such as He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, its spin-off series She-Ra: Princess of Power, and Ghostbusters*, and animation techniques that were budget friendly, including long establishing shots and animation reuse.  During the series’ two seasons, twenty-two episodes aired.

Budget-friendly animation helped ST:TAS, allowing the series to bring back most of the cast to reprise their roles for the cartoon.  With the reuse of animation, artists could ensure that the characters looked like their actors.  Also because of animation, aliens were no longer limited to looking like humans in rubber masks.  Two new crewmembers were introduced, Lieutenant M’ress, a cat-like communications officer, and Lieutenant Arex, a tripedal navigation officer.  Both additions allowed Star Fleet and the Federation to feel larger and inclusive.  Thanks to being animated, alien worlds could look alien with no more effort it took to paint a corridor of the Enterprise.

ST:TAS brought in science-fiction writers as much as the original series did.  Larry Niven wrote “The Slaver Weapon”, bringing in his Kzinti from his short story, “The Soft Weapon”.  David Gerrold, who wrote the original series episode, “The Trouble With Tribbles”, revisited the furry ecological menaces with “More Troubles, More Tribbles”.  DC Fontana, who both wrote and was a story editor for the original series, contributed “Yesteryear”, a look at Spock as a young boy.  The limitations of the format, a 22-minute long cartoon, was worked around and, in many cases, used to great effect.

For a while, the animated series was considered non-canonical, except for the cases where it was.  Kirk’s middle name, Tiberius, was given to him by Gerrold in “More Trouble, More Tribbles”, and stuck.  Fontana’s “Yesteryear” provided such a rich look at both Spock’s early life and Vulcan culture that it was more-or-less accepted as is.  “Yesteryear” is part of Spock’s story arc, as he evolves from having his Human and Vulcan sides at odds to him accepting that he is part of both worlds, as seen in Star Trek: The Motion Picture and Star Trek IV: The Voyager Home.  Canonicity has returned in bits and pieces, with ST:TAS being mined for background for different characters.

The series continued to delve into social issues and showcased characters that didn’t get spotlight time in the original series.  Of note, “The Lorelei Signal”, by Margaret Armen, placed Uhura in command of the Enterprise after the male crewmembers fell under the effect of space sirens.  Beings that appeared to be dangerous turned out to be misunderstood.  The dangers of introducing an invasive species were explored.  The show worked to keep to the spirit of the original series.  While there were episodes that fell flat, the same happened with the original series.  However, the animated series took what it had and expanded the Trek universe, entertaining fans who were starved for new episodes without disappointing them.

Star Trek: The Animated Series transcended the Saturday morning cartoon format, bringing back the crew of the Enterprise to boldly go, once again, where no man has gone before.

* Not to be confused with The Real Ghostbusters, the animated adaptation of the Ghostbusters movie.

Posted on by Steven Savage

(This column is posted at www.StevenSavage.com, www.SeventhSanctum.com, and Steve’s Tumblr)

What is this? Another update? Yes, amazing.

So anyway, to give you a bigger story on my slow blogging it’s pretty much been one thing after another. Mostly work and some shuffling around duties, software releases, and more. It’s also been a bunch of other stuff going on from helping friends out to errands. I haven’t had life get this much on top of me in awhile, though the smoke appears to be clearing.

The funny thing is it all goes back to that two days of classes I had. I’m sort of wondering if losing two days was a catalyst. Plus side, I got a great certification out of it.

Now let’s get to a REAL update here.

  • Bonnie and I were interviewed about our new Sailor Moon Book on The Crystal Chronicles. Go check it out!
  • The Pizza Generator. Haven’t done a thing on it, plan to return. That was pretty low on my list, which is kind of tragic as I’ve got enough data to go with – and learned a few things about Pizza. Going to see about getting that sucker out.
  • The Next Generator. Still gonna be food, but I’m still conflicted between coffee (which would be more funny considering pretentious names of coffee types) or a real serious one on candy bars based on my analysis of candy structure. The candy bar generator would literally make candy bar ideas that would be real and you or someone could make. Oh and in other news, I am anal-retentive enough to analyze candy bar structure – are you aware that there have been multiple forms of filled/chambered candy bars?  I am now because I am weird.
  • Way With Worlds Book 2. At the editor, and it’s the same person who did the Sailor Moon book. She rocks hard so this is gonna be a great edit. I miss my other editor, but life got busy and I can damn well relate. Still looking at Q1 in 2017.
  • The Way With Worlds “extra” book(s) I keep dodging about are in the works. I’m debating if I should release “something” early as the other book is delayed. Still haven’t decided – but let’s just say you’re gonna keep seeing Way With Worlds stuff into 2107. What, you think I used ALL my material?
  • As for other writing, I have a few small books in the works, some of which are creativity-based.  These are going to be good but also act as more “fun” to write so have no deadline. One of my big projects in 2017 on (about 12-15 months) is to do a book on what I’ve learned about randomization and procedural generation and the psychology of creativity.

That’s it for me – what about you?

– Steve

Seventh Sanctum™, the page of random generators.

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Seventh Sanctum(tm) and its contents are copyright (c) 2013 by Steven Savage except where otherwise noted. No infringement or claim on any copyrighted material is intended. Code provided in these pages is free for all to use as long as the author and this website are credited. No guarantees whatsoever are made regarding these generators or their contents.


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