Posted on by Scott Delahunt

Lost in Translation has analyzed the two American-made Godzilla movies, both the 1998 version and the 2014.  The history of Godzilla and Gojira are expanded in those, but the short version is that title kaiju began as a message about the horrors of the atomic age, espeically the atomic bomb.  As the franchise progressed, Godzilla became the defender of the Earth, though not necessarily of humanity has he rampages through Tokyo leaving massive collateral damage in his wake.  The 2014 Hollywood version changed the message, from the dangers of the atomic era to the dangers of climate change.

However, the 1998 and 2014 versions were not the first American adaptations.  Prior to them, the animation studio Hanna-Barbera licensed the character in 1978 from Toho to create the Godzilla cartoon.  What better way to entertain young children on a Saturday morning than watching a giant monster rampaging through the cities of the world?  Considering that local stations, particularly in the UHF band, had more control over their time slots than today and had more hours to fill with local programming, both weekend afternoons and late-night and overnight hours, the very same young children watching the Godzilla cartoon would be able to watch an older Godzilla movie later the same weekend.

The series followed the crew of the Calico, a research vessel travelling the world’s oceans.  While Captain Carl Majors was in charge of the ship, Dr. Quinn Darien was the head of the unspecified research project.  Quinn had two members of her team, Brock, her research assistant, and Pete Darien, her nephew.  Rounding out the team is Godzooky, Godzilla’s young nephew.  When the crew of the Calico is in a tight spot, they summon Godzilla himself.

A typical episode would have the Calico in a location by the ocean making a new discovery, usually related to the giant monster of the week.  The crew investigates, with Pete and Godzooky often told to remain behind because of the danger.  If they were told, eventually they disobey and follow.  The giant monster is found and Godzilla is summoned.  The first fight between titans is a draw as the newcomer’s abilities either force Godzilla to back down or allows it to run away.  The team tracks the giant monster and summons Godzilla one more time for the final fight.  The draw of the show, though, is the battle between giant monsters, and the cartoon does deliver.

While the crew of the Calico was created for the cartoon, Godzooky is based on an existing character in the Godzilla mythos – Minilla.  First appearing in Son of Godzilla, Minilla, known as Minya in some dubs, is the son of Godzilla.  Both Minilla and Godzooky share some traits, including blowing smoke rings instead of fire and being young giant monsters.  Godzooky was in the cartoon to appeal to the kids; he is very much a lovable pet who gets into trouble but is too cute to be angry with for too long.  He is also very much child-like in that he wants to help even if he isn’t able to be effective.

The animation of the rest of the cast is along the lines of Hanna-Barbera’s own Jonny Quest.  Techniques developed with the various Scooby-Doo series can be seen, particularly as the crew runs as a group.  Godzilla is very much in line with his cinematic appearances.  However, one of the draws of the movies, the casual destruction of cities as Godzilla stomps through, was reduced or completely removed, thanks to Broadcast Standards and Practices..  BS&P had strict guidelines on what could and could not be shown, and things like breathing fire on people and crushing buildings and cars underfoot were against the guidelines.  As a result, Godzilla tended to use laser beams from his eyes more this is atomic breath, which was turned into a flame breath.

While Toho licensed the character, they didn’t license Godzilla’s roar.  The studio worked around that limitation by hiring Ted Cassidy, best known as Lurch on The Addams Family and Ruk on the Star Trek episode, “What Little Girls Are Made Of”, to give voice to Godzilla.  Cassidy’s work, combined with the animation of the title character, gave weight to the monster, keeping the fierceness associated with Godzilla.

Given that the cartoon was meant for a younger Saturday morning audience, Hanna-Barbera succeeded in what they set out to do.  Godzilla lasted two season, and ran until 1981 on NBC.  While not the best adaptation it could have been, the studio’s limitations, imposed from within by format and target audience and from outside by Broadcast Standards and Practices, meant that the production was going to hit diminishing returns.  It’s not a perfect adaptation, but the Godzilla cartoon did remember the key elements to the kaiju‘s fame.

Seventh Sanctum™, the page of random generators.

...  ...  ... ...

Seventh Sanctum(tm) and its contents are copyright (c) 2013 by Steven Savage except where otherwise noted. No infringement or claim on any copyrighted material is intended. Code provided in these pages is free for all to use as long as the author and this website are credited. No guarantees whatsoever are made regarding these generators or their contents.


Seventh Sanctum Logo by Megami Studios